Home > RGC Public Lectures > 30 July 2016 - RGC Public Lectures - Particle Physics

RGC Public Lectures - Particle Physics

Two leading scholars have been invited to deliver public lectures on Particle Physics organized by the Research Grants Council on 30 July 2016 (Saturday). Details of the lectures are as follows:

Topic Speaker Time
Studying the Neutrinos - Chasing after Ghost Particles

Dr Jason Chun-shing Pun (Principal Lecturer, Department of Physics, The University of Hong Kong)

2:30 pm - 3:30 pm

The Quest for Fundamental Structures of Matter

Professor Ming-chung Chu (Professor, Department of Physics, The Chinese University of Hong Kong

3:30 pm - 4:30 pm

Venue: Lecture Hall, Hong Kong Science Museum (Location Map)
Language: Cantonese
Free admission on a first-come, first-served basis.

For enquires, please contact us at 2524 3987 or rgc@ugc.edu.hk.

First Session

Topic: Studying the Neutrinos - Chasing after Ghost Particles
Speaker: Dr Jason Chun-shing Pun
Time: 30 July 2016 (Saturday) 2:30pm - 3:30pm


Brief introduction:

Among all the elementary particles - the fundamental building blocks of all matter - neutrinos are the most abundant in numbers but yet the least understood. Many exciting discoveries had been made recently - we now know neutrinos have mass, and they transform from one type to another through neutrino oscillation. Properties of neutrinos have profound implications in particle physics, cosmology and astrophysics; they may hold the key to explaining why matter dominates anti-matter in the universe, a key condition of our existence. In this talk, the speaker will introduce the tremendous efforts by scientists to chase down these "ghost particles," including recent results from the Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Experiment, which represents the first time Hong Kong scientists participate in a major international particle physics experiment.


About the Speaker:

Dr Jason Chun-shing Pun is currently Principal Lecturer at the Department of Physics, The University of Hong Kong. Research interest of Dr Pun includes particle physics, cosmic ray physics, astrophysics of supernovae, supernova remnants and X-ray binaries, and the scientific studies of light pollution. He is one of the founding collaborators of the Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Experiment, which used neutrinos emitted from the Daya Bay nuclear reactor complex, about 50 km from Hong Kong, to study the phenomenon of neutrino oscillation.

 

Detectors inside the Daya Bay Far Hall (Credit: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory)

Inside the anti-neutrino detector of the Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Experiment (Credit: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory)

 

Second Session

Topic: The Quest for Fundamental Structures of Matter
Speaker: Professor Ming-chung Chu
Time: 30 July 2016 (Saturday) 3:30pm - 4:30pm


Brief introduction:

Since ancient time, the idea that all matter is made of indivisible 'atoms' has been embraced by many philosophers and scientists. The properties of these 'atoms' - or elementary particles in modern terminology - are therefore believed to be fundamental ingredients for understanding all physical phenomena in Nature. The recent breakthroughs in elementary particle physics - including the discovery of the Higgs particle (known as 'the God particle' to the public) at the Large hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN and a new type of neutrino oscillation by the Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Experiment - mark the beginning of a golden era in fundamental physics. The discoveries are important not only in themselves, but also in opening up a window of opportunities to discover new physics that may revolutionize our understanding of the fundamental structure of matter and the universe! The speaker will introduce at an elementary level these achievements and their implications, as well as a range of new physics that particle physicists will search for.


About the Speaker:

Professor Ming-chung Chu obtained his B.Sc. and PhD degrees both at California Institute of Technology (Caltech). He held research positions at MIT and Caltech before joining the Chinese University of Hong Kong in 1995. His current research interest includes astrophysics, cosmology, and particle physics.

 

Event display of a Higgs boson candidate decaying into two electrons and two muons in the ATLAS detector (Credit: CERN)

View of the ATLAS detector opened (Credit: CERN)

The Daya Bay Far Experimental Hall with 4 antineutrino detectors (Credit: Qiang Xiao)